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Parents and Community

Teacher Script: How to Call Home with Behavioral Concerns

Goals for call

  1. To inform parents of problem behavior before they get too big or if problem is big
  2. To enlist parent help/support/cooperation in supporting the kids behavior
  3. To inform parents on their student’s strengths (positive feedback)

For Minor level:

“Hello, this is (my name is…) _________________________________. I’m     students name     teacher (other roll) at     school name      .”

“First let me say that                  (student)             is (doing great in….., is a very neat kid……, is very [something positive about the kids behavior or academic effort]).”

“I’m calling just to let you know that we have talked to               (student)              about a small issue that happened the other day (or today, yesterday, state date…etc.) This issue has been successfully resolved and is no cause for further action on your part. We believe that you would like to be informed about any behavioral issues involving your child/student early on with the goal of cooperating in keeping your child safe and successful at school.”

[State what happened in a non-judgmental, business-like, operationally descriptive way. Remember to focus on the behavior, not the kid – stressing that we love the kid even if the behavior is a problem. Be sure to tie the behavior to being Safe, Responsible, and Respectful at School]

[Use statements that ask the parents to help us in supporting their student.]

“ The issue has been resolved and no action on your part is necessary. Your student was most cooperative and showed a lot of respect and responsibility by working with me/us to resolve the situation in a mutually beneficial manner. I/we would like to ask your help in acknowledging their cooperation by telling him/her that we talked and that you are proud of the way he/she took responsibility for resolving the situation and showed respect for me/us in working toward that resolution. Please let them know that they showed a lot of character by taking that responsibility.

[If they ask, tell them what the consequence was. If the consequence was just a redirect, reteach, or some other low-level consequence, tell the parents that no consequence was necessary – that you just discussed the issue in terms of being safe, responsible, respectful]

“Thanks for taking your time to take my call.              (student)              is a great kid and it is a privilege to have him/her in class!”

 

For Majors/ODRs:

 

“Hello, this is (my name is…) _________________________________. I’m   teacher (other roll) at Terrebonne.”  students name     

“First let me say that                (student)             is (doing great in….., is a very neat kid, is very [something positive about the kids behavior or academic]).”

“I’m calling just to let you know that we have talked to               (student)              about an issue that happened the other day (or today, yesterday, state date…etc.) This issue has been addressed at the school by          (the teacher, the principal, others, etc)              . We are calling to inform you about this behavioral issue involving your child/student with the goal of cooperating in keeping your child safe and successful at school.”

[State what happened in a non-judgmental, business-like, operationally descriptive way. Remember to focus on the behavior, not the kid – stressing that we love the kid even if the behavior is a problem. Be sure to tie the behavior to being Safe, Responsible, and Respectful at School

[If they ask, tell them what the consequence was. If the consequence was just a redirect, reteach, or some other low-level consequence, tell the parents that no consequence was necessary – that you just discussed the issue in terms of being safe, responsible, respectful]

“This problem has been resolved by (state consequence and agreement with student for future behavior is similar circumstances) and there is no need for you to take further action. You could help us a great deal by talking with your child and telling him/her that you talked with us about the issue and that you support behaving in a safe, responsible, and respectful way while at school. It would be helpful if you thank your child for cooperating with us in the resolution of this issue, and that you are proud of them for taking responsibility.”

Or, if you need parental involvement…

“This problem has been addressed at the school by (state consequence and agreement with student for future behavior is similar circumstances). However, we feel that there is a need for you to also address this problem at home by (give suggestions for supporting the child’s behavior at home through pre-corrects from parents, reminding the child of parental expectations regarding the student’s behavior at school, perhaps a low-level consequence that addresses the function of the behavior at home). You could help us a great deal by talking with your child and telling him/her that you talked with us about the issue and that you support behaving in a safe, responsible, and respectful way while at school. It would be [very, most] helpful if you thank                      (student)             for cooperating both at home and at school in the resolution of this issue, and that you are proud of them for taking responsibility.”

 

Adapted from Stephen Smith, 2010